Monitoring and protection against marine threat system

FIELD: transport.

SUBSTANCE: system uses communications facilities, user interfaces and data sources to identify marine obstacles (for example icebergs, ice floats, pack-ice, etc.) located in close proximity to target vessel executing installation operations (for example permanently installed structure executing drilling or production operations, or seismic recording vessel executing exploration with planned route). The system implements location monitoring of these identified marine obstacles for a time relative to target vessel and predict any potential threats. When a threat has been predicted the system plans deployment of support vessels, beacons, etc. in order to counter a threat. For example, the system can forward support vessel to deviate course or break ice threatening target vessel.

EFFECT: improved safety on vessel line of march.

21 cl, 12 dwg

 

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

[0001] the Present application claims the benefit of provisional patent application U.S. No. 61/488879, filed may 23, 2011, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety, and the priority of which is claimed.

The LEVEL of TECHNOLOGY

[0002] Over the past few years has significantly increased production of oil and gas in new regions such as the Arctic. This increasing activity makes it more likely that these regions will be used at fixed or floating production platforms, drilling ships and other structures. Concern for these types of structures in these regions raises the possibility of damage to the objects of their uncontrolled, floating or submerged in water, such as floating wreckage of a ship sinking cargo, debris, icebergs, ice floes, and other threats ("sea of obstacles"). In the ice regions, for example, large icebergs and powerful ice may pass through the field of exploration, mining and drilling. Although the industrial court can be designed to withstand some of the impact from such a sea of obstacles, yet the court may have a limit to how long they can withstand the impact of such a sea of obstacles, and the potential impacts they can withstand� secure.

[0003] For these reasons, the operators on the production vessel or other structure will have to expect threats from obstacles and to defend against them, and thus the production vessel can be adequately protected. If conditions become too dangerous, operators may also need to suspend operations and move production vessel, until the return to normal functioning will not be safe. The ability to do this reliably can have exceptional importance for operators.

[0004] the Object of the present disclosure is directed to overcoming or at least reducing the effects of one or more of the problems set forth above.

Summary of the INVENTION

[0005] the System and method of monitoring and protection against Maritime threats protect the target marine structure that pursues a "docking" operations in regions with Maritime obstacles that can threaten the structure. Generally, the target marine structure can be a production vessel, a production platform, drilling ship, wellhead bore hole, riser, seismic vessel or other marine structure used in drilling, mining or in the operations of exploration of the sea, etc Structure can be floating or fixed and may be permanently or temporarily attached to the bottom �ora. Therefore, the structure can be installed at a certain point (i.e., "set") for drilling, loading, tanker, repair work on the well, underwater maintenance or other such operations for drilling or production operations. For exploration of structure, such as a seismic vessel, may intersect the area of exploration for scheduled (i.e., "set") for seismic data acquisition or production of further exploration.

[0006] the Ice region, such as the Arctic, has icebergs, ice floes, and other obstacles that are floating in marine waters and are transported by currents and under different weather conditions, and such obstacles can threaten the structure, conducting installation operations (e.g., vessel set at a certain point for drilling or production, or the vessel with the planned route for exploration in this region. Other waterways such as oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, estuary and coastal areas, may have floating debris of ships sinking cargo and debris that float in water and are transported by currents and influenced by other weather conditions. Just as ice can threaten the operations, these obstacles can threaten to "set" the structure, when she spends a stationary or planned�separate operations on the waterways.

[0007] to operate with the Maritime threat to the target marine structure, computer monitoring system has client-server architecture and has different components and processes, distributed in the environment around a target vessel. The system uses communication tools, user interfaces and data sources in order to identify Maritime threats and obstacles that are in the vicinity of the target vessel.

[0008] At least perform operations, for example, system operators control the position and movement of the identified marine obstacles over time relative to the target vessel and predict any potential threats to the target vessel. The threats predictions can be based on past, current and projected values of the variables, including, but not limited to, travel the sea of obstacles, currents, speed and wind direction, wave height, other weather conditions, be executed on a target vessel operations, and other considerations. When the threat is predicted, the system and its operators are planning a response to the threat, which may include deploying at least one resource in response to the predicted threat. This planning can use many UI screens that allow systems�first operators to view, organize, track and trace like a sea of obstacles, and resources that are in the vicinity of the target vessel.

[0009] in General, resources can be managed by a person or unattended courts ensure, lighthouses, remotely operated vehicles, aircraft, etc. When planning the deployment vessel, for example, the system may generate a route for a vessel to monitor the marine obstacle or to cling to the marine obstacle to reject or break up the sea of obstacles in order to prevent or minimize their potential impact on the target ship. When planning the deployment of a beacon having a transponder satellite system GPS geolocation, for example, the system can choose what kind of marine obstacle may require such monitoring and tracking.

[0010] In General, the monitoring system protects the target vessel in real time by a centralized monitoring ambient conditions and any current activities. For example, the monitoring system may track the position of the sea of obstacles, monitor environmental conditions, to predict movements of the sea of obstacles, to organize an expedition for the exploration of the sea of obstacles, op�anisoylated icebreaker routes for vessels locating and tracking beacons on sea obstacles in real time and to generate alarms based on the forecast of movement of objects around the target vessel. In order ultimately to work with threats, system operators on the target vessel and the courts ensure that can perform a variety of tasks on information-gathering and management responses to various threats. Some of these tasks include exploration of threats, monitoring, or marking specific threats, destruction threats and actively changing the way of threats.

[0011] Obviously, the possession of correct information is useful when making decisions on the protection of the target vessel. To achieve this goal, the system uses an online data management, data transfer, vessel tracking and tracing of objects. To then facilitate analysis and decision making, system operators can view the latest images and data obtained about the location of these elements. In addition, a prediction function systems use models predict ocean currents, monitoring transponders and tracking of obstacles so that the system can make predictions for the future, and operators can simulate possible scenarios of development of events.

[0012] finally, it should be noted that the disclosed system can s�ing system operators relevant information to determine a plan of action for the protection of the target vessel from incoming threats. Making the wrong decisions can be very costly and entail various financial problems, security issues and concerns for the environment. Therefore, the monitoring system has the advantage that it allows operators to properly dispose of the target vessel can be protected when it should shut down and when it must be taken out of threatened area if the risk levels are too high.

BRIEF description of the DRAWINGS

[0013] Fig. 1 schematically shows a system for monitoring and protection against Maritime threats in accordance with the present disclosure.

[0014] Fig. 2 schematically shows some of the components of the monitoring system, including target vessel, support vessel, the lighthouse and the remote device, along with the various services used by the system.

[0015] Fig. 3A-3B show the functions of the client-server architecture for the monitoring system.

[0016] Fig. 4A-4B schematically show the General methodology for computing and data processing for the monitoring system.

[0017] Fig. 5 conceptually shows the components of the monitoring system in an example, the layout during operations.

[0018] Fig. 6 shows the process of monitoring threats to the target vessel in the form of a block diagram.

[0019] Fig. 7A-7D show exemplary user interface screens revealed for� system.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A. a Brief overview of the monitoring system

[0020] As noted earlier, protection is attached, fixed or fixed offshore structures or marine structures with planned movements or routes from marine obstacles and impacts a significant problem for drilling, production, and exploration in some marine regions such as the Arctic. To cope with this problem, the operators on this structure can use the system 10 for monitoring and protection against Maritime threats, which is schematically illustrated in Fig. 1. The monitoring system 10 protects the target marine structure 20 located in the region, such as Arctic, with floating and/or submerged objects that move in the ocean and threaten the structure 20.

[0021] In General, the target marine structure 20 may be a production vessel, a production platform, drilling ship, wellhead bore hole, riser, seismic vessel or other marine structure used in drilling, mining or exploration operations in the sea. Structure 20 may be floating or fixed, and may be permanently or temporarily attached to the sea bottom. Therefore, the structure can be installed in a specific fact�ke (i.e., "installed") for drilling, loading, tanker, repair work on the well, underwater maintenance or other such operations for drilling or mining in the area. For exploration of the structure 20, such as a seismic vessel, may intersect the area of exploration for scheduled (i.e., "set") for seismic data acquisition or production of further exploration. In any case, the structure 20 typically operates in one specific location for a certain period of time to perform drilling, production exploration, which makes it vulnerable to moving threats from marine obstacles in the water. In order to describe the structure 20 is referred to herein as a target ship, however, the structure 20 may be any of several types of structures, vessels, platforms, etc., are known and are used for drilling, extraction and production exploration and appraisal activities on the waterways.

[0022] As will be discussed in the examples below, such target vessel 20 may be used in the ice regions with glacial ice, pack ice, ice floes and other ice barriers. However, the vessel 20 and the elements of the disclosed system 10 can be used in other geographic locations with debris, plants, flotsam �satisfa, sinking cargo or other obstacles or barriers, submerged and/or floating in the water, which can interfere with the drilling, mining or production exploration vessel 20. In addition, the disclosed system 10 may also monitor marine animals such as schools of fish, herds of whales, etc., so that various measures can be taken by the target vessel 20. The disclosed system 10, as described in the examples below, can be used for monitoring and protection of the target vessel 20 in any of these situations in the same way as discussed below.

[0023] When used in the ice area, for example, the target vessel 20 is subjected to threats from a moving sea of obstacles, namely, the flotsam of ships sinking cargo, debris, icebergs, ice floes, free pack-ice, and other hazards that can hit the ship 20 and cause structural damage that exceeds the restrictions for the vessel. Marine obstacles can move freely in the area around the target vessel 20, and weather conditions, ocean currents, wave height, direction and speed of wind, and other environmental factors can affect the movement of these threats. Additionally, ice regions can have the pack ice of different thickness and with different number of layers. Part of this pack-ice m�gut to break away over time, float in ocean currents and threaten the vessel 20. Consequently, the ability to track the threat posed by ice and monitor the thickness of the pack ice and its destruction can be advantageous to protect the target vessel 20 in this region.

[0024] in order to help operators to improve the safety level of operations (e.g., drilling, production or exploration), the monitoring system 10 monitors, predicts in advance and takes action against various threats in the ice region. To achieve these goals, the system 10, among other features that will be discussed in more detail later, has a different court's 30 components, lighthouses support 40, the apparatus 50 of surveillance and communication equipment (not specifically designated).

[0025] In the system 10 hardware on the target vessel 20 acts as a Central control, and it communicates directly with each of the vessels 30 components and other components of the system 10. In turn, the various ships 30 components and other components that must be located, managed, and accompanied by the system 10 execute the software to perform tasks and receive data to protect the target vessel 20. Finally, the court 20/30 and other components pass data and instructions to each other in order to act proactively against threats from Stour�us marine obstacles.

[0026] Briefly, the system operators control the system 10 to the target vessel 20 so as to be protected from incoming ice threats. As you perform operations (drilling, production or exploration), and threats to the system 10 helps to control operations of vessels 30 titles that have the task of protecting the target vessel 20, and helps to track and monitor ice threats relative to the target vessel 20. As part of this management system 10 receives and uses the information about the ice formations and their locations from 60 different satellites, such as weather satellites, observation satellites and the satellites of the GPS geolocation system. Additionally, the system 10 can receive image and other information using the remote apparatus 50, such as unmanned aerial vehicles, etc., in order to obtain weather information or photos. In addition, the system 10 may receive information from remote base stations 65, land-based, such as meteorological stations, etc.

[0027] the monitoring System 10 then uses the software, communications systems, and satellite weather images, etc. so system operators can visualize and manage the different threats that are around the target vessel 20, and can allocate and n�edit various court 30 components and other components, to track and work with these threats. To help in the visualization and management of the system 10 in real-time monitoring of ocean currents, wave height, weather conditions (temperature, direction and wind speed, etc.), debris and ice in the vicinity of the target vessel 20, and this information can predict the movement of ice and changes in the environment.

[0028] Then, during operations, the system 10 monitors risks from debris and ice threats and predicts how these risks can evolve in time. The forecast can be based on information, such as information about normal directions and speeds of the local ocean currents, current directions and velocities of the local ocean currents, where it is currently located icebergs or floating ice, what is the reliability of any forecast, etc. in addition, if the target vessel 20 is used for the production of exploration, such as seismic exploration, target vessel 20 has a planned route or course of movement. In this case, the forecast may be further based on the current speed of the target ship, direction, route, scheduled date, etc.

[0029] based On the tracked risks and forecasts, the system 10 may then IDA�to tapicerowane and automatically suggest different scenarios to improve the protection of the target vessel 20 by designating, can the obstacles to be moved or destroyed in an appropriate time interval, when to remove the anchor and move the target vessel 20 from the predicted threats, etc.

[0030] By means of this monitoring, tracking and forecasting the monitoring system 10 receives and presents system operators to analyze a lot of data. These direct observations from sensors and beacons 40 can in real time to provide information about the location of 30 vessels, icebergs, ice, oceanic currents, speed and direction of wind, and other interesting variables. Sensors and beacons 40 can be deployed manually or by air discharged from the vessel 30 components, helicopters, RC UAV, etc. sensors Used can include profilometry ice, such as upward looking sonars to detect the presence, thickness, motion, and other parameters of sea ice. Examples of such devices include sonar-Profiler ice and acoustic Doppler Profiler currents that are deployed in water depths of 25-60 metres below the surface. Additional data for the analysis include, but are not limited to, satellite imagery of ice, a file format ESRI (Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc.), manually certain �repetitve with assigned titles and level of threat, predictive models of ocean currents/ice flows, historical data of ocean currents, the vessel's position and prohibited areas, the indications of the standard of the ship and the ice radars and algorithms for automatic identification. To predict the movements of ice in the water system can use profilometry ice, mounted on the seabed, which can measure the ice thickness (approx) size of the floating ice floe, and conduct other measurements.

[0031] by Combining all this information, system operators can then use the system 10 to direct the court's 30 components to perform the selected tasks, such as the passage route of the destruction of the marine obstacles, physical deviation of the marine obstacles, visual observation of marine barriers, deployment of beacons 40 remote monitoring, etc. At the end of the system 10 seeks to identify risks as early as possible to predict where these risks will move over time, and identify protective measures against threats to the target vessel 20 can continue operations. In addition, the system 10 may also identify the threat level and how much time you may need to stop the installation operations, and possibly to move or evacuate the vessel 20.

[0032] As bol�e is discussed in detail below, system operators use the planning tool of the system 10 in order to proactively monitor the environment, assess the risks and take the necessary decisions, such as giving commands to the courts ensure 30 to catch sea of obstacles that pose a threat, and the leavetaking of the command ships provide 30 to perform exploration work and icebreaker on a predefined route (for example, "fence", "treadmill", elliptical, orbital and other types). As shown in Fig. 1, for example, for a vessel 30a ensure the defined task is to navigate a route type of "fence" to prevent ice threats, breaking the ice and being in readiness to move obstacles if necessary. The operator may also issue commands to the courts 30 ensure to observe and mark the identified marine obstacles that pose a threat. For example, another vessel 30b components in Fig. 1 set the objective to observe and mark the particular iceberg. Reconnaissance can also be performed by the remote apparatus 50, such as unmanned aerial vehicles, which can reset the beacons 40, take photographs of the topography of the ice, to make weather measurements and perform other jobs around the target vessel 20. These and other details with�system 10 are discussed below.

B. Components of the monitoring system

[0033] With the understanding of the monitoring system 10 in General discussion then focuses on the precise details of the system components.

[0034] Fig. 2 schematically shows some components of monitoring system 10, including the target vessel 20, the vessel 30 ensure, beacon 40 and the remote device 50. Also in Fig. 2 shows the various services 140 used by the monitoring system 10. As will be understood, other relevant components may also be used and may be based on some of the same concepts that are detailed below. In addition, this implementation may have more or fewer of these components.

[0035] the Target vessel 20 has a communication system 22, sensors 24, server modules 120 and user interfaces 26. During operation of the communication system 22 receives data from various remote services 140, including service 142 weather service 144 satellite observations, 146 remote databases and services 148 geolocation using satellites or other forms of communication. Service 144 satellite observations can use synthetic aperture radar (SAR) for mapping and monitoring of floating wreckage of ships sinking cargo, debris, icebergs, ice floes and other sea ice and can provide images in real-time (Il� at least in the regime near real-time) via the Internet or other communication means. In addition to these remote services 140 the target vessel 20 can be their own sensors 24, such as radar, imaging, weather sensors, and other such systems, which can also collect local data in the vicinity of the vessel 20.

[0036] Simultaneously, the operators use the user interface 26 and the various functions of monitoring and management server module 120 to analyze and organize the collected data. Server modules 120 and the user interface 26 are performed on workstations of the system client-server architecture, which will be described later. Based on the threat analysis, the predicted trajectories of moving obstacles and tasks in dealing with threats to system operators can then send instructions to various courts 30, beacons and 40 remote apparatus 50, distributed in an area around the target vessel 20. In turn, these components 30, 40 and 50 can implement these instructions as detailed herein in order to respond to threats to the target vessel 20.

[0037] for its part ensure the ship 30 has a configuration similar to the configuration of the target vessel 20, and includes a communication system 32, sensors 34, and user inter�the interface, click visual 36. Instead of having server modules, the vessel 30 software is client modules 130 that can operate on one or more workstations system client-server architecture with the server module 120 of the vessel. (Of course, the reverse arrangement in which the target vessel 20 has client modules 130, and at least one of the vessels 30 software is server modules 120.) During operation of the communication system supply vessel 32 can also receive data from various remote services 140 and may receive instructions from the target vessel 20.

[0038] the Vessel 30 also has different local sensors and systems 34 for collecting local data, which will later be used for monitoring and analysis. Some local system 34 includes a weather device, a differential global positioning system (DGPS), sonar, acoustic Doppler Profiler currents (ADCP), automatic identification system (AIS), radar (regular and ice), sonar and other systems.

[0039] Similar to the operation of the target vessel operators on the vessel 30 programs rely on the user interface 36 and the various functions of monitoring and management of client modules 130 in order to execute the instructions of the target vessel. Similarly, operators can use these components for analysis and org�the organization of the collected data and transmit those data and other information to the target vessel 20 and/or 30 other vessels components.

[0040] the lighthouse 40 may be mounted on the ice a beacon for tracking ice barrier or may be floating buoy to monitor ocean currents, wave heights and weather conditions. For example, the beacon 40 may be similar MetOcean compact discharged from the air ice beacon (CALIB) company MetOcean Data Systems, which is telling a mini-lighthouse. This type of beacon 40 may be deployed from the aircraft, and information that allows you to track its position, might be regularly downloaded from the web site for use in the disclosed system 10.

[0041] As generally shown in Fig. 2, the lighthouse 40 has a communication system 42, sensors 44 and 46 transponder satellite GPS geolocation, and local power supply (not shown). After you deploy the transponder 46 receives the GPS readings from the service 148 satellite GPS geolocation to determine the location coordinates of the beacon 40. For example, the beacon 40 deployed on the ice, can track the movement of the ice, while the lighthouse 40 deployed in the water, such as buoys, to track ocean currents. When the beacon 40 is running, the sensors 44 may receive information about weather, location, and even seismic information. In the end, the collected data and the GPS readings from the lighthouse 40 can be transmitted by communication systems 42 vessels 20/30 for use in various functions�the functions of monitoring and management system 10.

[0042] finally, the remote apparatus 50 has a communication system 52 for communication at least with the courts 20/30 and service 148 satellite GPS geolocation, although the relationship with other services 140 can also be used. The sensors 54 are collecting data and client module 130 processes the operation of the apparatus 50. In General, the remote device 50 may be an unmanned aerial vehicle to deploy beacons 40 or to obtain images, aerial photographs, weather data, etc. in desired locations around the target vessel 20. Alternatively, the remote device 50 may be remotely operated vehicle, or other underwater apparatus to measure the depth of ice in the water, measure the temperature or velocity of water flow, etc. Since it is unmanned, remote device 50 can be remotely controlled with the target vessel 20, or even with another vessel 30 and can exchange data and instructions with the vessels 20/30.

C. Client / server architecture

[0043] With the understanding of the monitoring system 10 as a whole and its components further discussion focuses on the additional details of system computer architecture. As previously mentioned, the system 10 uses a client-server architecture. Server modules 120 can be used on the target vessel 20, and client modules 130 can be used on ships 0 software and other components. Alternatively, the server modules 120 can be used on vessels 30, and client modules 130 can be used to target vessels 20 and other components. Because she has a client-server architecture, the disclosed system 10 can be used on a single workstation on a single vessel or may be used on many servers located in many courts.

[0044] for illustrative purposes Fig. 3A schematically shows a client-server architecture of the system 100 in the form of a block diagram. Briefly, the architecture 100 has server modules 120 on the target vessel (20; Fig. 1) or other components and has client modules 130 by at least two support vessels (30; Fig. 1). As will be understood, the system 100 may include more 20 target ships and/or more or less than 30 vessels components. Additionally, client modules 130 can be used in a number of other components, such as remote devices, beacons, etc., as noted previously. Different client modules 130 are associated with a server module 120, which acts as a Central management system 10. In some situations, however, the client modules 130 can also communicate with each other in order to transmit information and instructions.

[0045] As a client-server architecture 100 may have different processes,distributed on these modules 120 and 130. Thus, the client module 130 in the vessel 30 may be its own operating system that can work regardless of the server module 120. However, the server module 120 can manage the whole job and can add and delete client modules 130 for vessels 30 components or other components from the configuration of the architecture.

[0046] To this end Fig. 3B schematically shows the various processes of the client-server architecture 100 that can be distributed and shared in the system 10 and monitoring modules 120 and 130. Process data server 110 acts as a Central process and a communication hub between all the different processes and operates independently from any of the client processes. Different interface processes 111 contact the on-Board equipment of ships (e.g., 20/30) in order to receive external information. For example, interface process 111 may receive information from navigation systems (e.g. satellite geolocation system GPS, echo sounder, passive radar homing PRH, gyro, radar, etc.), satellite imagery, weather data, etc. the Interface process 111 may also issue data to other systems, such as steering system, navigation system, alarm system with�nalizatsii, etc.

[0047] the Display process 112 is arranged to use on different displays, distributed system architecture 100. Each display can be configured to the requirements of the user, and various satellite and other images of the environment, showing ice formations, weather, and other details can be displayed in user interfaces display process 112, as described below. Additionally, the position of the vessel and obstacles can be superimposed on the image in the user interfaces of the system, and constraints can be assigned to attributes in order to describe their past and projected travel, sizes, levels of threat and other details.

[0048] Computing processes 113 calculates the position of the vessel, perform collision detection, predict the path of movement of ships and obstacles and perform other calculations. Forecasting and ways of moving obstacles can help operators and system 10 to assess threats and risks and implement tasks to work with them. For example, by performing collision detection between ships 20/30 and ice obstacles computational processes 113 may generate alarm signals if the predicted potential collision.

[0049] the Configuration processes 114 allow� operators to configure the system, for example, to define the data interfaces, displays, workstations, court security, logging regulations, communication settings, and any exclusion criteria for alarms. In addition to working in conjunction with the target vessel 20, each vessel 30 components can be installed system components that can work regardless of the target vessel 20. In particular, the configuration processes 114 are planning tool 118. As discussed below with reference to Fig. 7A-7D, the planning tool 118 is a graphical application that allows system operators to view transactions and determine a plan of protection for the target vessel 20.

[0050] the Process of logging 115 register data for monitoring purposes. The architecture 100 jurnalisme the provisions of the various courts and ice obstacles with their corresponding attributes with suitable intervals in order to create history. This information can be used for re-analysis or audit purposes and can be stored in the audit database. This journalobama information in the audit database can track all the data and various operational decisions taken that may be especially useful for the reconstruction of events if something goes wrong during operations. Ar�itecture 100 and also marks jurnalisme satellite data files of ice for later use. Using all logged and tagged information, operators can create reports for any vessel or ice obstacles.

[0051] the Processes 116 quality control and reporting can generate reports and data for review and analysis. Processes 116 may allow operators to create a variety of graphical reports and can have a diagnostic application (not shown) which monitors the health of the system architecture 100. Diagnostic application, for example, can provide data relating to performance and serviceability of the system architecture 100, and may have separate processes and interfaces to external systems. The application of quality control (not shown) may allow operators to configure a variety of interactive graphs containing any data journalonline in the system databases.

[0052] finally, the communication processes 117 transmit data between vessels 20/30, beacons 40, the apparatus 50 and other components. Using various forms of communication, the architecture 100 automatically updates the deleted blocks on ships of 30 welfare-to-date information. The connection can be established using Maritime satellite terminal with a very small aperture (VSAT), through a multiband radio communication lines or other communication lines.

[0053] Adverse �Agoda often violates satellite communications, and the possibility of wireless communications in the Arctic is highly dependent on the weather. For this reason, any of the remote sensors, beacons and 40 vessels 20/30 can save data up until the weather conditions do not allow them to pass. Additionally, these components may be alternative communication capabilities, such as radio point-to-point", so that the unmanned aircraft or ship may be directed to the neighborhood of any of the key sensor or a component to retrieve the data and transfer it back during interruptions in satellite and wireless communications.

D. processing Methodology

[0054] the Components of the disclosed system 10 monitoring using client-server architecture 100, as outlined earlier, follow the General methodology of treatment, as schematically illustrated in Fig. 4A. As shown, methodology 70 processing system includes a data collection (block 72), transmission (block 74), decision making (block 76) and the response to the threat (block 78).

[0055] as a starting point and as shown in Fig. 4B, the client-server architecture 100 has a variety of resources and data sources 80, which are involved in data collection (block 72) methodology 70 processing system shown in Fig. 4A. As mentioned earlier, some of the resources 81 include vessels, beacons, remote devices, and other components DL� data collection for client-server architecture 100. Satellite data 82 can come from weather satellites, satellite tracking ice conditions and satellite geolocation systems GPS, and manual data 83 can come from visual observations, overflights, etc. Client-server architecture 100 may also receive local data 84 on the target vessel (20; Fig. 1) from the radar system GPS geolocation, etc.

[0056] Finally, the target vessel (20) has its own electrical, signal and operational systems, and these target data 85 of the vessel can be used client-server architecture 100. In addition, any current operation performed on the vessel (20), and structural constraints of the vessel may be part 85 of the vessel, the available client-server architecture 100. For example, the target vessel (20) may be able to withstand different levels of wind, current and ice conditions during a certain period of time, but may have structural limitations that must be taken into account.

[0057] as another example, data 85 of the vessel, current operations (drilling, production or exploration) performed with the target vessel (20), may dictate how much time is needed to complete the work of the vessel (20) and move it to another location if necessary. In other words, the vessel (20) may Panadol�seek to stop drilling pull the riser or to involve seismic cables before a vessel (20) can be moved or redirected, and these operations may take a certain amount of time. If these operations occur on the vessel (20), any time frame for risk assessment may take into account the length of time required to complete the "installation" (i.e., stationary or planned) operations, for discontinued operations (for example, to stop drilling, to pull the riser or to retract seismic cables, etc.), to move the vessel (20), escape routes, etc. take into account Any periods of time will depend on the type of patterns involved (i.e., the vessel 20), type "setup" (i.e., stationary or planned) operations (e.g., drilling, production, exploration etc.), as well as other factors.

[0058] in order to receive and transmit all these collected data (block 72), as shown in Fig. 4A, the client-server architecture 100 uses various forms of communication (block 74). As noted, the various components of the system 10 can use any of the many available forms of communication (block 74) for the environment. In most cases, you can use satellite or radio depending on �ugodnih conditions and can also be used other forms of radio communication using relay stations, etc. As will be understood, can be used for many types of communication systems.

[0059] upon Receiving the collected data (block 72), the client-server architecture 100 passes through different decision-making processes (block 76) to develop a managed response (block 78). The decision-making process (block 76) may use prediction algorithms, decision trees, weighing risks and other methods and can be performed via automatic computer processing and human intervention in order to fend off threats to the target vessel 20 from the side of the ice, etc.

[0060] In particular, the architecture 100 in decision-making processes and the formulation of response (blocks 76 and 78) manages resources and data sources 80 and data collection (block 72) by the support, direction and configuration of the vessels 30, beacons 40, etc. in order to collect data and identify threats. Then, the client-server architecture 100 can provide operators on the vessels 20/30 results 90, such as resource management 91, risk assessment 92, alarms 93, instructions 94 and 95 monitoring.

[0061] In resource management 91, for example, system operators can manage the various tasks and operations of the vessels 30, beacons 40, apparatus 50 and other resource� around the target vessel 20. As we continue operations the results of the risk assessment 92 can anticipate threats, prioritize tasks and perform other assessments. Then, depending on the threats and their severity, can be initiated alarms 93 on the basis of different time intervals or stages in order to warn the operators about the threats to the target vessel 20.

[0062] Finally, the operator can transfer the instructions 94 to the other components of the system 10, such as ships, etc., and can specify the action plan and to organize a response to threats. When monitoring 95 client-server architecture 100 monitors the entire operation by logging the collected data and generate reports, etc. for further analysis.

E. the operation of the system

[0063] With the understanding of the components of the system 10, its architecture 100 and used different processes, we now turn to the discussion of how the monitoring system 10 operates to protect the target vessel 20 from threats in the region. Again the current example focuses on the threats that you may encounter in the ice regions, however, the system 10 can be applied to any Maritime region in which you can meet up with threats.

1. Working with the threats from marine obstacles

[0064] in order To better illustrate how mo�itoring and how threats are identified, and are generated as tasks and plans to work with threats, we turn to the example shown in Fig. 5, in which the components of the system 10 shows the conceptual along with some possible graphic elements that can be displayed in the user interfaces of the system 10, for example, the planning tool 118, as described herein. Target vessel 20 is shown with only some of its components, including the server module 120, the communication system 22 and the planning tool 118, although in reality there are also other components. This example also shows two vessels 30a-b components, each of which has a client module 130. Finally, this example also shows the different ice obstacles O, including the first obstacle O1second hurdle O2and various smaller obstacles O3. One of these obstacles O2have an existing lighthouse on it 40.

[0065] in General, the marine obstacle O can be floating wreckage of ships sinking cargo, debris, icebergs, ice floes and other floating threats to the target vessel 20, portable the ocean and the currents, and sea obstacles O can be defined in the system 10 as a single or multi-point objects. Every marine obstacle O in the system 10 can have a set of related and�of ribalow - some of which can be displayed, as will be described later. The attributes can be obtained in various ways, such as manual input of coordinates; graphical definition information using the display screen and the mouse; automatically obtaining from radar targets, satellite images or from the lighthouse 40; and in other ways.

[0066] On the target vessel 20 and 30 courts ensure the server and client modules 120/130 can be used to create and delete different marine obstacles O in the vicinity of the target vessel 20. Information about the obstacle is preferably transmitted automatically between each of the vessels 20/30. For consistency in the system 10 in General, the information about the obstacle is distributed automatically between the various courts 20/30.

[0067] Using the information exchange, for example, information about the obstacle can be displayed on a local user interface remote vessels 30 components. These local user interfaces outline at least all the active threats in the local area. Using client modules 130, local operators on ships of 30 components can create and remove obstacles O in the system 10 and to modify their attributes. During the monitoring of the court 30 may also provide the physical�and mark obstacles O disposable navigational beacons 40, used to track the obstacles in real time.

[0068] when Discussing particular examples of this system with reference to Fig. 5, see also the monitoring process 150 shown in Fig. 6. Although the General methodology has already been discussed, the process 150 for monitoring threats to the target vessel 20 shown in Fig. 6 in some additional detail.

[0069] In the monitoring system 150 operators use user interfaces planning tool 118 of the disclosed system 10, which allows system operators to monitor threats. Initially, system operators identified marine obstacles O that are in the vicinity of the target vessel 20 (block 152). As noted earlier, this manual can be used surveillance, satellite imaging, image ice, etc. Detailed information about the position of obstacles, the size, shape, direction of movement, etc. is imported into the planning tool 118 of the system, and system operators can use the planning tool 118 in order to create and edit detailed information about the obstacle. Some, if not all, of these functions can be automated using computer programs.

[0070] With time scheduling tool� 118 monitors the situation of these identified obstacles O relative to the target vessel 20 (block 154). This monitoring results in the historical path of movement T of the obstacle O, which can be viewed by system operators and analyzed by the system 10. Thus, the planning tool 118 can predict the path of travel T of the obstacle O on the basis of historical movements, ocean currents, the size and position of obstacles, etc. (block 156). These predict and then determine what threats may exist to the target vessel 20 and what are the possible time slots available before these threats become imminent.

[0071] the System operators then use the planning tool 118 in order to plan various tasks to respond to the predicted threats (block 158). In order to do this, system operators can configure the number of tasks or assignments, which will be performed by the courts of the 30 components and other components. These different tasks can be organized in different scenarios in which specific resources (for example, the court's 30 components, beacons 40, the remote apparatus 50, etc.) are deployed in different ways to reflect the predicted threats. Each scenario is essentially a predictive model showing the possible displacement and changing threats in the environment and possible strategies and objectives of laurajane these threats. Thus, scenarios allow system operators to create and analyze multiple situations like "what if" using observational data available in the system 10. Each scenario can have different predictive models and can allow system operators to visualize possible outcomes and risks.

[0072] For each scenario, the disclosed system 10 uses the selected predictive models of marine obstacles in order to predict the displacement path of T for each obstacle O, and constantly checks for the possibility of future collisions. Target vessel 20 may also be assigned multiple security boundaries Z, such as borders Z1, Z2and Z3shown in Fig. 5. If any marine obstructions O invades the border security of the vessel Z, the system 10 generates an alarm signal that can be displayed and logged. This information allows system operators to select the optimum plan of action for the protection of the target vessel 20.

[0073] When system operators are satisfied with predictive models, scenario and task lists of the courts system operators then select the script and publish it in the system 10 (block 160). This makes the script active and circulates it through the various vessels 30 software and other system components. �donkey that can be generated graphical reports cards, displays, user interfaces, etc. that describe the scenario, the tasks of the courts, moving ice obstacles, etc.

[0074] When the court 30 ensure receive new active scenario, for example, vessel operators can use the planning tool 118 of the system, working on the ship's modules 130, in order to identify the tasks to be performed. Various tasks can be listed together as planned and may indicate that the suggested routes, estimated time of arrival and duration of tasks. As tasks are completed, the vessel operators can update the status of each task in the task plan by indicating such status as "accepted", "rejected", "active", "completed" and "cancelled" (block 162). For consistency status updates of tasks can then be automatically saved and distributed to other parts of the system 10 so that all the operators knew exactly the status of the plan scenario.

[0075] With the understanding of the monitoring process shown in Fig. 6, let us now return to Fig. 5 in order to discuss some specific examples of this system with reference to an exemplary arrangement of components shown. As noted earlier, various obstacles O, court 30 components, etc. surround the target vessel 20 and the system 10 can store the specific�found items for these components. System operators in the target vessel 20 and 30 courts can examine and update these details at any time.

[0076] During operations, for example, the system 10 tracks the actual movement of the ice and builds historical path of movement of T0. As soon as the ice barrier created, for example, the system 10 records the history of previous positions, which is updated over time and can be recorded. In turn, the recorded data can be used to Refine the model, tracking and other functions of the system 10.

[0077] the System 10 also monitors the icy obstacles O marked positional beacons 40, such as an ice obstacle O2shown with a lighthouse 40. As noted earlier, the lighthouse 40 transmits update the position of the obstacles that may be obtained by any ship 20/30. These updates provisions are passed back to the target vessel 20 for permanent logging and provide historical information for tracking obstacles O2. Thus, the position of the obstacles are updated automatically as new files the position of the transponder are downloaded and imported, so the observed displacement path of T is constantly being completed in the database of the open system.

[0078] In addition to tracking ice obstacles O �system 10 can track the path P of vessels 30 components, showing where court were 30. In addition, the system 10 may determine the way of diversions, the implementation of which is expected from vessels 30 to handle icy obstacles O. This allows operators to plan for full coverage and indicate, were there any obstacles O are missed or inadequately evaluated.

[0079] As mentioned above, the system 10 may also predict the future movement of the ice on the basis of available information, including historical travel, ocean currents, wind direction, weather forecast data, information direct surveillance from remote beacons, etc. in order to forecast future travel icy obstacles, the planning tool 118 allows operators to mark any number of ice obstacles O. Then the system and operators can automatically or manually update or move obstacles O as imported and visualized new satellite image.

[0080] the planning Tool 118 of the disclosed system may then offer some predictive models for icy obstacles O. for Example, manual ice forecast model obstacles may offer a fixed procedure. In this model, the system can assign speed headers and obstacles O. System operators can �to leave for the speed and the default title or update these details as required. As part of this manual tracking, the operator can use the imaging capabilities of the user interface of the system to manually pave the predicted direction D and speed S based on the result of observation of the movements of the obstacles, as well as images of ice over a period of time. In one example, the first obstacle O1has only one speed S and one D direction assigned to it, and these details can identify at least the short term movement of the ice obstacles O1. This information can then be used to predict the forward motion of the obstacle O1from its last recorded position.

[0081] In contrast to the manual forecast system 10 can also perform automatic forecast icy obstacles. Using the historical path of movement discussed above, the disclosed system 10 uses the resulting observation of the path of movement of the ice obstacles and predicts future travel and speed. Looking ahead, updated information about ocean currents, wind directions, etc. can be further used to Refine the predicted path of displacement and velocity.

[0082] Example�, the speed S and the historical path of movement of T0icy obstacles O2can be used to generate a predicted travel path T, which can have a probability range (i.e., from T+ to T-). This can be useful in predicting movements of large areas of ice in the next few days and weeks, so that system operators can visualize ice threats and their predictable migration routes.

[0083] Based on the predicted paths of each obstacle O, the system 10 determines which of the obstacles O represents a future threat to the target vessel 20. The system 10 then generates alarms, identifying the different levels of threat. Based on alarms, the operators on the target vessel 20 and/or 30 courts can ensure a better protection plan.

[0084] for Example, obstacles O can have levels of threat based on the predicted paths T and other information about the obstacle O. the Different threat levels can be set depending on the implementation and desired volume definition. For example, "minor" threat level can be used to obstacles O that represents a low operational risk. This may be the case for small obstacles O3that are too small�and, to endanger the target vessel 20 and its operation or the approach of which to the vessel 20 is not expected. With such a minor threat level of the obstacle O3potentially can be treated by the courts 30 ensure, either by breaking or by the deviation of their course (i.e. using their towing tug or network, or by pushing them water jet, etc.). However, if the obstacle O3left alone and remains at this level, the obstacle O3may is not operating threats to the target vessel 20.

[0085] In another example, a "medium" threat level can identify obstacles that represent operational risk for target vessel 20, but may be treated by the courts 30 providing and/or target vessel 20. For example, the first obstacle O1can have medium level threats, because it predicted travel path T1the size, current speed, etc. can be handled by a local vessel 30A.

[0086] Finally, the "main" threat level can identify obstacles that pose operational risk to the target vessel 20 and cannot be processed by the courts 30 providing and/or target vessel 20. For example, an ice obstacle O2can have devastating path of movement of T2and may be too large and�and too fast for to reject his local vessel 30B.

[0087] in order to help identify the threats that the system 10 may use a variety of security boundaries (e.g., Z1-3) defined in the environment around the target vessel 20. These boundaries Z can visually indicate dangers in the zones relative to the target vessel 20 and can alert operators when an icy obstacle O may enter within the boundaries of Z. Each boundary Z can be associated with the correct security measures, such as the cessation of drilling, lifting anchor, etc., so that operations could be halted in time in accordance with a specific threat.

2. User interface

[0088] As noted previously, the monitoring system 10 uses a number of user interfaces for display on the vessels 20/30. Generally, these user interfaces can display satellite data on ice conditions, ice obstacles, radar targets, lighthouses, ships, and other elements of the monitoring system 10. The attributes of the various elements can also be viewed, and can be configured multiple displays.

[0089] Some examples of screens 200A-D user interface for the disclosed system 10 is described below with reference to Fig. 7A-7D. These screens 200A-D user interface may be part of the planning instruments (118; Phi�. 3B and Fig. 5) working on the architecture of the system 10 on the vessels 20/30, so that the operators can view information, configure the system 10 to monitor threats and to monitor and schedule tasks, and other activities in response to threats.

[0090] Each of the screens 200A-D of Fig. 7A-7D, may be the main viewing area 210, a number of docks and auxiliary or pop-UPS, some of which will be described below. As noted earlier, system operators use these different screens 200A-D user interface, and others that are not detailed in the present document, in order to visualize the environment. Accordingly, the main viewing area 210 typically indicates data 212 image for the region around or near the target vessel 20. These data 212 images can be computer generated map, satellite image, the image of ice, or a combination of, the data 212 of the image may be imported from files downloaded from external sources (e.g., 140; Fig. 2).

[0091] In an example, the screen of the user interface 200A shown in Fig. 7A, for example, the main viewing area 210 212 has a map of the area around the target vessel (20), which is shown as an icon on the map 212. For its part, the map are the field can be updated its scale may be increased or decreased, and above it can be other manipulations of the system by users. Of course, the viewport 210 screens 200A-D user interface may have more than one spatial display and the additional display area can be manually added and then fixed. In addition, each display can be configured individually. For example, one area of the display can show a satellite image of ice conditions, while another may show the last image with the ice radar.

[0092] the Image to the viewport 210 may be provided with office staff, vendors, remote services, etc., so you can use various forms of electronic delivery, including email, downloading files from an ftp server, Internet connection, satellite link, etc. Additionally, for display and analysis can be used a variety of image formats. For example, image formats ice conditions, such as satellite Geotiff raster images and ice charts of the ESRI (Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc.), can be imported and used. In addition to these image formats ice system 10 can import image files in a database format Besson�x images multiresidential (MrSID, Multiresolution Seamless Image Database). This file format (file extension.sid) developed and patented by LizardTech, is used to encode raster graphics gridded, such as orthophotos.

[0093] the Raw image data can be included in user interfaces, displays, and other components of the system 10 for use by operators on the vessels 20/30. In addition, the software can perform shape recognition ice formations recognized and coordinate education for map and location. In turn, this processed data can be made available to different user interfaces and display modules on the vessels 20/30, allowing operators to visualize ice formation relative to other components of the system 10. Additional details of user interface elements will be described later.

[0094] In another example, the raw data on ice conditions can come in standard geographic format file, such as a GIS format that provides visual information about the ice formations along with information on the whereabouts of. Some information on ice conditions may include an indication of the concentrations of ice and other useful details. However, regardless of the format f�, select t, these ice formations can be collected from many sources and can be updated at regular intervals.

[0095] After importing the images are saved in memory (i.e. on the local disk and/or a remote server) and is registered in the system 10 for future use in the user interface, such as screens 200A-D. for Example, image files can be archived by type and indexed by date and time for future use in the user interface screens 200A-D and other features of the disclosed system 10. Target vessel 20 can distribute the downloaded image files of various courts 30 components.

[0096] the System operators can then decide to overlay this information onto any display of other information in user interfaces and displays. In other words, operators can overlay information about the ice formations on various screens, menus and maps. On the screen 200A, for example, different views can be selected in the window 230 in order to show or to impose different components or features in the main viewport 210.

[0097] Some common options, available for viewing include satellite image, weather image, image of ice conditions, the location of vessels, the location of the beacons, risk areas, etc. Thus, over any of the scenes environment screen 200A may display the selected graphic details, such as �the location of the vessels 20 and 30, restricted areas, certain obstacles (current position and historical path of movement of icebergs and floating ice floes), the pack ice, and other elements, as discussed herein. Weather information such as temperature, speed and wind direction, areas of high and low pressure, ocean currents, etc., can also be graphically displayed or indicated. Thus, system operators have at their disposal a set of display settings to configure how data and image layers form a multilayer image and displayed in the main viewing area 210.

[0098] for Example, the main viewing area 210 in Fig. 7 shows the image of ice conditions, as well as the relative positioning of the various vessels 20/30 beacons and 40 of the system 10. The pack ice 214 shown in relation to land 216 and the pack ice 214 is shown graphically with a concentration of information on the ice with the help of color coding, etc. of the Court 20/30 shown graphically relative to the pack-ice 216, as well as different beacons 40. All of this information is entered into the system manually and/or automatically based on the coordinates of the satellite system GPS geolocation and other collected data, as disclosed herein.

[0099] As further shown in the example depicted in f�G. 7A, the attributes associated with the element in the main viewing area 210 may be displayed in a docking area 220, a pop-up window 232 or on additional screens (not shown). For example, a docking area 220 shows color-coded, and the corresponding concentration of ice used in the main viewing area 210.

[00100] the Key (legend) 222 shows the graphical symbols for the various system components, and attributes of ice can be displayed in a docking area 224 of attributes. Here the attributes of ice can be based on the sea symbolism of ice from the world Meteorological Organization (WMO), which is commonly referred to as the "code of the egg" (Egg Code) and shows the total concentration partial concentration, stage of development and the predominant form of ice.

[00101] When the system user interacts with the display elements, various pop-UPS 232, etc. can display additional information. For example, if the mouse pointer is passed over the vessel 30 in the main viewing area 210, the pop up window 232 shows information about this vessel 30, such as the identity, position, heading, speed, etc.

[00102] In an exemplary screen user interface 200B shown in Fig. 7B, the main viewing area 210 again shows the image 212 of ice conditions, which�th was downloaded and imported into the system 10. Additionally, submission 230 from another system visualization environment can be selected for display as different layers on the map display. Court 20/30, beacons 40 and other system components are also shown in relation to the image 212 of ice conditions. One vessel V3shown with a pop-up window that indicates its attributes such as position, heading, speed, and current task. To finer detail shows the system elements can be accessed through the user interface, using additional screens so that information can be added, updated, and processed as needed.

[00103] As noted earlier, data from the beacons 40 can be imported from files GPS transponder, and the file of forecast ocean currents can also be downloaded, imported and indexed in the same way. This information can then be used in the screen of the user interface 200B. In particular, system operators can visualize and measure the ice threat on screen user interface 200B. As soon as the ice threat is identified, the operator on the target vessel or vessels ensure 20/30 may determine recently identified an icy obstacle, as being subject to monitoring.

[00104] for Example, four l�danych obstacles A-D, located in close proximity to the target vessel 20, are beacons 40, and their historical migration routes and the predicted motion path can be tracked and displayed on the screen. Obstacle And also has a pop-up window showing its attributes such as position, heading, speed, size and current level of threat. Again, the more subtle details of the obstacles can be accessed through the user interface, using additional screens so that information can be added, updated, and processed as needed.

[00105] as part of the predicted path of the moving obstacle, the system 10 may have access to forecast models, as discussed earlier, for ocean and wind currents, and can use them to predict ways of moving obstacles. Obtained oceanic and wind currents can also be displayed in the main viewing area 210, which shows the flow C in the vicinity of the target vessel 20.

[00106] Finally, as further shown in Fig. 7B, the target vessel 20 can have its own planned route R, for example, if the vessel 20 moves in the water with the installation operation, such as the conduct of marine seismic surveys. Information on the planned route R the IP�to alisovtsy system 10 in the evaluation of predictive models, as discussed previously predicted for ways to move obstacles and threats to the vessel 20. Additional information about the vessel 20 and its route R can also be used in predictive models, including, but not limited to, the current speed of the target vessel, current direction, future location, the current phase of operation (i.e., whether the deployed cables offshore seismic exploration or not), etc.

[00107] unfortunately, as only the position of the obstacle is defined, it will inevitably change as the sea ice continues to move. In addition, it is not always possible to mark each ice threat lighthouse 40 and observe the situation as it is automatic updates. Nevertheless, the operator still may want to identify an icy obstacle on the display and track its movement. In order to do this, the operator may manually update the position of any specific obstacles at any time, or the system 10 may use methods of shape recognition of objects in image data and automatically update their position.

[00108] One such dedicated obstacle without a beacon 40 is an obstacle E in Fig. 7B. Since the provisions journaled in the database of the open system manually according to the results of observations or by recognizing the shapes of images of ice, moved�e this highlighted the obstacles of E can then be monitored visually and calculated with respect to the target vessel 20.

[00109] Fig. 7C shows another example screen user interface 200C for planning tool (118) of the system. In addition to the already described functions, the screen 200C shows the predicted path or the programmed path of movement of the ice obstacles O, 30 vessels, etc., and also shows the use of various system resources. As noted earlier, system operators can assign tasks 30 vessels security, and trial 30 software can assign tasks to yourself. Tasks include monitoring specific ice obstacles or take action to reject the designated icy obstacle from his path of movement. System operators can use the screen 200C planning tool (118) in order to determine the recommended course for the vessel 30, which provides the performance of a specific task.

[00110] In the screen 200C user interface of the system, for example, the operator can assign specific tasks 240 to any one of 30 different vessels components. Tasks include instructions to physically observe ice barrier, actively reject particular icy obstacles on a different course, to perform reconnaissance and defensive maneuvering, etc. Using a combination of available data and projections, the operator can then take decisions�, what tasks should be performed, if necessary. The tasks usually assigned 240 30 vessels provide and include exploration of ice-definition ice goals, monitoring these goals and their marking. For ice patrol vessel 30 may be assigned a General reconnaissance role. The task can be formulated for a specific area or specific route of the vessel, or it can simply be left to the discretion of the captain of the vessel.

[00111] To determine ice purposes the vessel 30 ensure the appointment is made to find, destroy or reject a particular icy obstacle O or area of the ice. For ice monitoring purposes the vessel 30 ensure the appointment is made to monitor a specific ice obstacles so that the information could be entered into the system 10. For marking objectives, the ice vessel 30 ensure the appointment is made to mark a particular icy obstacle beacon transponder 40 with GPS.

[00112] the Disclosed system 10 can automatically calculate a route for the vessel T, required to complete the task, starting from the current position of the ship or from the end of the previous problem. The disclosed system 10 also calculates the estimated time required to move between tasks.

[00113] Task 240 to 30 vessels provide only�safety screens 200C user interface of the disclosed system, therefore, users can immediately see the task schedule 240, estimated completion dates of tasks and estimated task duration for vessels of 30 components. Another way of presenting the tasks shown on the screen 200D user interface depicted in Fig. 7D, which has a calendar display 250. By moving the sliders of time in calendar display 250 plans can be shown in the main viewing area 210 with the predicted paths identified ice obstacles and all the planned routes of ships in the course of performing their tasks 240. Using calendar display 250, the operator can coordinate and schedule the tasks of the vessel 240 is the most efficient and safe way.

[00114] in order to build a calendar display 250, journaled data (the vessel's position, the position of obstacles or transponders, images, ice, etc.) are marked with timestamps, so that the information can be displayed spatially depending on time. Calendar display 250 also allows the operator to define calendar events, such as the availability of the vessel 30 support; scheduled downtime scheduled import images of ice, files GPS transponder or other files; and identification of threats from starodynova obstacles.

[00115] By selecting the plan and drag the mouse pointer to the slider of the plan on the calendar display 250, for example, the operator can animate other displays, such as the main viewing area 210, over time. Such a move allows the operator to visualize how the ice moves over time, and to observe trends and potential threats to the target vessel 20. The operator can also see the scheduled vessel 30 and the predicted movement of the ice and obstacles in order to appreciate how it will work a plan to reduce threats to the target vessel (20).

[00116] Although only some screens of the user interface for the system 10 shown in Fig. 7A-7D, it will be understood that the user interface and the various modules of the system 10 can use multiple screens for entering, modifying, and displaying information. For example, there may be a screen of the user interface that allows operators to communicate and transmit instructions between the courts, to resolve business issues, change, or configure the system, etc.

[00117] the Methods of the present disclosure can be implemented in digital electronic circuits or computer hardware, embedded firmware, software, or in combinations of them. The device for implementation�Oia of the disclosed methods can be implemented in a computer software product, the material embodied in a machine-readable storage device for execution by a programmable processor; and a stage of the disclosed methods can be performed by a programmable processor executing a program of instructions to perform functions of the disclosed methods by operating the input data and generating output. Suitable processors include, as an example, microprocessors, both General and special purpose. Typically, the processor receives instructions and data from permanent memory and/or memory, including magnetic disks such as internal hard disks and removable disks; magneto-optical disks; and optical disks. Storage devices suitable for tangibly embodied instructions of computer programs and data include all forms of nonvolatile memory, including as an example of the semiconductor memory device such as EPROM, EEPROM and flash memory devices; magnetic disks such as internal hard disks and removable disks; magneto-optical disks; and CD-ROM. Any of the preceding can be supplemented by, or incorporated in the composition of specialized integrated circuits (ASIC).

[00118] the Foregoing description of preferred and other embodiments is not intended for Thurs�to limit or restrict the scope or applicability of the concepts of the invention, conceived by the applicants. As was discussed earlier, the disclosed system and methods can be used in ice regions with glacial ice, pack ice, ice floes and other ice barriers. However, the disclosed system and methods can also be used in other locations with debris, plants, floating debris of ships sinking cargo, sea animals, or other obstacles, or submerged and/or floating in the water obstacles that might prevent you from drilling, extraction or production of exploration. Therefore, the description of the present disclosure is not limited to use only in the ice regions. In exchange for the disclosure of the concepts of the invention contained in the present document, the claimants wish to receive all patent rights in accordance with the attached claims. Therefore, it is assumed that the appended claims includes all modifications and changes fully as if they were included in the scope of the attached claims of the invention or its equivalents.

1. Method of monitoring the Maritime threat to the target marine structure, including:
identification with the help of a computer system of one or more marine obstacles in the vicinity of the target marine structure, carrying out the installation inten�and in the waters;
monitoring using computer systems at locations of the one or more identified marine obstacles over time relative to the target marine structure;
forecasting with the help of computer system threats target marine structure based on the tracked location of one or more identified marine obstacles; and
planning with the help of a computer system in response to the predicted threat to the target marine structure by the one or more identified marine obstacles.

2. A method according to claim 1, wherein the marine obstacles include iceberg, ice floe, ice pack, trash, plants, floating debris of ships sinking cargo, floating obstacles, submerged obstacles, marine animals, schools of fish, herds of whales or a combination of the above; and in which the target marine structure selected from the group consisting of drilling structures, drilling ship, production patterns, production ships, production platforms, wellhead bore hole, riser, exploration of the structure, seismic vessel.

3. A method according to claim 1, wherein the identifying by a computer system one or more marine obstacles in the vicinity of the target marine structure includes obtaining info�rmacie about the location from one or more beacons deployed on one or more marine obstacles.

4. A method according to claim 3, wherein the monitoring computer system, locations of one or more identified marine obstacles over time relative to the target marine structure includes positioning one or more marine obstacles using the location information of one or more of deployed beacons in the course of time.

5. A method according to claim 1, wherein the identifying by a computer system one or more marine obstacles in the vicinity of the target marine structure includes determining one or more marine obstacles for data visualization in the vicinity of the target marine structure.

6. A method according to claim 5, in which the monitoring by computer of the system locations of one or more identified marine obstacles over time relative to the target marine structure includes determining the displacement of one or more marine obstacles for data visualization over time.

7. A method according to claim 6, wherein the identifying by a computer system one or more marine obstacles in the vicinity of the target marine structure includes a manual data entry observing� one or more marine obstacles.

8. A method according to claim 1, wherein the prediction by the computer system threats target marine structure based on the tracked location of one or more identified marine obstacles involves determining the future of the travel path of one or more marine obstacles that pose a threat to the target marine structure.

9. A method according to claim 1, wherein the prediction by the computer system threats target marine structure based on the tracked location of one or more identified marine obstacles includes an attribute specifying one or more threatening marine obstacles and comparison of a specific attribute to the structural limit of the target marine structure.

10. A method according to claim 9, wherein the attribute is selected from the group consisting of size, distance, speed, shape, depth, motion paths and the threat level.

11. A method according to claim 9, in which the structural limit of the target marine structure includes a threshold effect, which can withstand the target marine structure from one or more marine obstacles, the time interval required to stop the installation operations of the target marine structure; or a time interval required to move the target marine structure from the threat posed by one or more�more marine obstacles.

12. A method according to claim 1, wherein scheduling with the help of a computer system in response to the predicted threat involves planning the deployment of at least one resource in response to the predicted threat.

13. A method according to claim 12, in which planning for the deployment of at least one resource includes the deviation of one or more threatening marine obstacles by sending one or more vessels to one or more threatening marine obstacles.

14. A method according to claim 13, in which the deviation of one or more threatening marine obstacles includes the destruction or moving of one or more marine obstacles in one or more courts.

15. A method according to claim 12, in which planning for the deployment of at least one resource includes tracking locations of one or more vessels with one or more marine obstacles and the target marine structure.

16. A method according to claim 12, wherein at least one resource selected from the group consisting of a supply vessel, beacon tracking, aircraft and machine with remote control.

17. A method according to claim 1, wherein scheduling with the help of a computer system in response to the predicted threat includes generating a task to monitor, reject, or marking one or more sea-level constraints�action.

18. A method according to claim 17, wherein the generating task to monitor, reject, or marking one or more marine obstacles includes sending at least one resource, the instructions generated to perform the task.

19. A method according to claim 1, wherein scheduling with the help of a computer system in response to the predicted threat includes determining a time interval required to complete the installation operations and move the target marine structure from the predicted threats.

20. A programmable memory device containing stored program instructions for prompting a programmable control device to perform a method of monitoring the Maritime threat to the target marine structure according to claim 1.

21. Monitoring system Maritime threat to the target marine structure, including:
communication equipment, receiving information about one or more marine obstacles that are in the vicinity of the target marine structure;
a memory that stores the received information; and
one or more servers operatively associated with connected equipment and memory, and one or more servers configured to:
identify one or more marine obstacles during the execution of the target marine structure mustache�inovacnich operations in the area,
to monitor location of one or more identified marine obstacles over time relative to the target marine structure,
to predict the threat to the target marine structure based on the tracked location of one or more identified marine obstacles, and
to plan a response to the predicted threat.



 

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FIELD: transport.

SUBSTANCE: invention relates to servicing of vehicles. Proposed process comprises collection and evaluation of data on tire air pressure and tire tread patter depth as well as on revealed damages and/or other defects. These are combined with unambiguous identification of the vehicle in the data processing system. Said vehicle is equipped with electronic marking means depending on the results of evaluation in said data processing system. Vehicles are directed to rental centre or repair shop depending on marking. Note here that tire air pressure and tread pattern depth are measured by load transducers.

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14 cl, 4 dwg

FIELD: physics, computer engineering.

SUBSTANCE: invention relates to means of distributing electronic information content for use with advertisements. The method includes creating a license which identifies at least one of slots within an electronic information content element designed for delivering advertisements. The license indicates at least one of advertisement types not permitted for delivery to the slots, and also indicates criteria for dynamic selection of an advertisement for delivery to at least one of the slots. To provide security, the electronic license is compared with the electronic information content and the electronic information content and electronic license are distributed to a third party for use or subsequent transfer to an end user.

EFFECT: high reliability of electronic information content transferred to an information network user by filtering illegal and licensed information.

10 cl, 20 dwg

FIELD: physics, computer engineering.

SUBSTANCE: invention relates to methods for dynamic generation and automatic control of information of industrial machines. The method comprises assigning a selected component in an industrial machine as an information master which is capable of transmitting data through the network bus of the industrial machine, obtaining data by the information master from at least another component of the corresponding industrial machine which is connected to the network bus of the machine, storing information of industrial machines based on the obtained data in the storage device accessible by the information master in accordance with a scheme determined by an object data model, assigning at least part of memory associated with the object data model as broadcast information, and repeated extraction by the information master of at least part of the information stored in the memory, assigned as broadcast information by the information master, generating a broadcast message representing the extracted broadcast information and transmitting the generated broadcast message via the network bus of the machine, wherein full content of the assigned broadcast information is ultimately transmitted via the network bus of the industrial machine through a plurality of transmitted broadcast messages.

EFFECT: high reliability of data on the technical state of industrial machines for efficient control of industrial machines.

15 cl, 12 dwg

FIELD: physics, computer engineering.

SUBSTANCE: invention relates to a system and a method of processing transactions. The method comprises steps of receiving, at a server computer from a terminal, an envelope associated with a transaction, wherein the envelope includes unencrypted detailed transaction data, a label extracted from the key associated with a terminal, an account identifier and at least a first part of the detailed transaction data; converting the label into an account identifier; verifying that the account identifier is associated with a real account and verifying the transaction, wherein verification ensures that the envelope was not modified between the terminal and the server computer.

EFFECT: improved security of financial transactions.

20 cl, 12 dwg

FIELD: medicine.

SUBSTANCE: invention refers to medical equipment. A method for managing the execution of clinical guidelines involving the stages, whereat: accepting an input comprising a patient's condition; retrieving a set of recommendations corresponding to the above condition; displaying at least a portion of the set of recommendations to the user; accepting the user's selection of recommendations from the set of recommendations, issuing warnings, if the user's selection is rejected from the recommended sequence from the set of recommendation; accepting the input that one of the recommendations has been executed; and changing the display of recommendations on the basis of the above input that one of recommendations has been executed.

EFFECT: automatic management of executing the medical guidelines.

15 cl, 3 dwg

FIELD: physics, computer engineering.

SUBSTANCE: invention relates to computer engineering and specifically to intelligent automated assistant systems. Disclosed is method of operating an intelligent automated assistant. The method is carried out in an electronic device having a processor and memory which stores instructions for execution by the processor. The processor executes instructions on which a user request is received, wherein the user request includes a speech input received from the user. A prompt is provided to the user, the prompt presenting two or more properties relevant to items of an object selection domain. The user is requested to specify relative importance between the two or more properties.

EFFECT: high accuracy of providing a user with relevant information owing to consideration of relative importance between properties which correspond to items of an object domain.

12 cl, 50 dwg, 5 tbl

FIELD: physics, computer engineering.

SUBSTANCE: invention relates to computer engineering and specifically to intelligent automated assistant systems. Disclosed is method of operating an intelligent automated assistant. The method is carried out in an electronic device having a processor and memory which stores instructions for execution by the processor. The processor executes instructions on which a user request is received, wherein the user request includes a speech input received from the user. Two or more alternative interpretations of user intent are obtained based on the received user request and one or more similarities and one or more differences between said alternatives are identified. Further, the user is presented with a response, said response being at least one of the identified differences.

EFFECT: high accuracy of presenting relevant interpretations of user intent in the correct context.

13 cl, 50 dwg, 5 tbl

FIELD: physics, computer engineering.

SUBSTANCE: invention relates to a security server, a payment recipient device, machine-readable media, a method of establishing a link between a payment recipient device and a client payment application and a method of receiving payment recipient device authorisation from the security server. A method of receiving payment recipient device authorisation from a security server comprises receiving a client identifier; sending a first message to the security server, wherein the first message contains a client identifier, an application identifier which indicates a client payment application, and a security token for the payment recipient device; receiving a second message from the security server, wherein the second message is received only when it is determined that the payment recipient device is authorised by the scheme provider, wherein the client payment application is contained in a security element, which is configured to be contained in a mobile communication terminal; and establishing a secure channel with the security element of a mobile communication terminal to make a payment using the client payment application.

EFFECT: safer payments.

22 cl, 12 dwg

FIELD: physics, control.

SUBSTANCE: invention relates to a railway vehicle remote control system. Disclosed remote control system comprises a remote control device in which haptic technology is used, configured to transmit signals to a first controller module. Said first controller module is installed on a railway vehicle and is configured to control the railway vehicle and perform current control of functions thereof. The first controller module is also configured to transmit information to the remote control device. The disclosed remote control system may also comprise a portable emergency switch, which enables any individual near the railway vehicle to transmit to the first controller module a stop signal for stopping the railway vehicle in case of emergency.

EFFECT: safer remote control system, particularly blocking operation of a locomotive based on instructions from a remote control device which is not yet handled or has been dropped, ie which has no contact with the operator.

14 cl, 11 dwg

FIELD: physics, computer engineering.

SUBSTANCE: invention relates to information and network technologies, and particularly to an electronic information system which enables generation and visual display on a screen of a terminal device a personalised graphic model of an individual based on input anthropometric, diagnostic, biochemical and other factors. The system is an extensible and modifiable modular interactive tool for rendering parameters of the functional state of an individual for reporting on the current state and existing functional problems. Operation of the system is based on use of parameters of the functional state of an individual, analytical and expert processing of all input parameters, creating an individual parametric model and forming a personalised graphic model for displaying the current state and existing functional problems. Using the system, an individual can monitor their own functional state, including health, and perform timely prevention of chronic diseases and other functional problems.

EFFECT: enabling an individual to self-monitor their health status and timely signalling of health disorders.

24 cl, 7 dwg

FIELD: computer science, in particular, system for situational analysis of passenger transportation.

SUBSTANCE: system has block for selection of database addresses, block for forming recording signals and reading server database, block for controlling selection of data, first and second registers, block for comparing codes, five blocks for selecting record parameters, memory block, first group memory block, second group memory block, third group memory block.

EFFECT: higher speed of operation of system due to localization of range of data search addresses in server database using voyage group identifiers and given time period.

11 dwg

FIELD: technologies for realization of an additional useful effect during purchase of consumer goods.

SUBSTANCE: method for realization of additional useful effect includes dispensing an individual code to consumer, providing access to commonly accessed data transfer network by means of appropriate data processing device, while wherein a software storage is present. Access to storage is performed by means of individual code, launched selected software remains accessible for a certain time, and after anticipated number of accesses individual code is blocked for any further access.

EFFECT: expanded functional capabilities and range of technical means of communication network for users, purchasing goods.

3 cl

FIELD: commerce.

SUBSTANCE: method involves selling goods by way of selling system comprising stores, distributing center and selling terminal chain; transmitting signals from buyer communication means to store communication means, said signals containing information on goods ordered by buyers, and transmitting signals from buyer communication means to store and/or distributing center, said signals containing information on selling terminals selected by buyers; preparing in stores ordered goods for sending and sending said goods to distributing center and further from distributing center to selling terminals selected by buyers; also transmitting signals from store communication means to selling terminal communication means, said signals containing information on buyers orders, and/or transmitting information carriers from stores to selling terminals, said information carriers containing information on buyers orders, with goods being stored in selling terminals and dispensed therefrom to buyers. Also disclosed is goods remote selling system.

EFFECT: reduced time and costs, increased turnover of merchandize and simplified construction of delivery means.

4 cl, 3 dwg

FIELD: method and system for data exchange for facilitating upholding of laws and standards on information transfers and confidentiality of individuals.

SUBSTANCE: method includes stages: transferring from system to user computer a notification, that object confirmed agreement to sanctioned confidentiality and data protection rules; receipt by system of confirmation of individual of receipt of object by server or confirmation, that object will receive and use personal data in accordance to laws active in the country where individual or object is located; transferring by system to server of data object about agreement of individual to aforementioned receipt; receipt of data object from server, containing personal data of individual; periodical check of agreement of object.

EFFECT: improved reliability of information exchanges.

2 cl, 15 dwg

FIELD: engineering of educational equipment, in particular, technology for performing exams with use of computer-based equipment.

SUBSTANCE: method includes forming on machine-readable carrier of database of simplified informative-mathematical models of operation of industries or organizations, aforementioned carrier is given to examinee with notification of variant, data are selected from database for forming more precise model of operation of organization or industry. From server along Internet network information about current values of macro- and micro-economical coefficients of country and the world are received, on basis of which examinee develops dependencies, allowing process calculations pertaining to financial and managing activities of organization or industry in given time interval, recording aforementioned dependencies on machine-readable carrier and checking these by examiner.

EFFECT: improved objectivity of estimation of knowledge of examinees.

3 cl

FIELD: engineering of systems for producing individually optimized products in accordance to request from client.

SUBSTANCE: device is made for producing care products for house pets in accordance to client requests, including food for house pets, wherein integrated client interface is used, based on the Internet, and controlling process for a series of actions, device is configured for receipt of individual data about house pets, receipt of orders for appropriate care product for house pets for each buyer, controlling equipment operation during production for processing each request, care products for house pets in accordance to requirements of each client, and for tracking product delivery through delivery system to house of client.

EFFECT: possible processing of orders from clients for food for house pets and presentation of care scheme data in accordance to individual data pertaining to house pets.

7 cl, 3 dwg

FIELD: engineering of information accumulation system, in particular - technology for performing an interactive game.

SUBSTANCE: each user is provided with means for identification as game participant, provided with a mark. As a mark, optical signal source is used. Positioning of device for receiving optical signals is performed relatively to multiple users. Source position of identification means of game participant is held relatively to means for receiving optical signals in accordance to game conditions. Game objects and rules are given to participants and game start signal is given. User targets his mark to appropriate means for receiving optical signals. Optical signals are received from game participants and received optical signals are registered in registration device. Signals are processed in accordance to given program and results are outputted on an information carrier.

EFFECT: possible polling of large group of participants and detection of winners, while maintaining anonymousness of results.

6 dwg

FIELD: engineering of equipment for processing documents.

SUBSTANCE: device has detector system for detecting characteristic signs of documents, controlling system for realization functions, connected to information, received by detector system and/or to documents processing method, aforementioned system includes memorizing device for storing a set of codes, each of which corresponds to appropriate function, and is made with possible permission of function use, if it is confirmed that transferred permitting code corresponds to one of stored function codes.

EFFECT: simplified adjustment processes of software-hardware equipment complex.

3 cl, 6 dwg

FIELD: engineering of computerized information-analytic trading means, possible use for negotiating orders for buying and selling during performing of trade operations with cashless payment using communication network.

SUBSTANCE: system has authorization and registration block, roles block, block for controlling price offers, price forming block, block for controlling formulas, logistics block, block for controlling agreements, block for finding goods and making agreements, ordering block, block for accepting, block for forming goods movement graphs, display block, block for forming characteristics of goods and goods batches, block for controlling goods, block for purchasing goods, payment block, block for registering goods at warehouses, balances block, notifications block, documents registration block, block for payments and determining payments, automatic procedures block, activation block, analytics block, goods card block, marketing block, participants block, sells block.

EFFECT: expanded functional capabilities due to control over deliveries and quality of goods and services.

1 dwg

FIELD: computer science, in particular, engineering of information effect system of information-marketing centers in integrated electronic trading infrastructure.

SUBSTANCE: system has three registration devices, two adders, block for selecting supporting recording address, block for selecting supporting reading address, block for selecting query source address, block for selecting current record address, block for forming temporal period address, block for forming database addresses, block for controlling recording and reading of data and data dispensing block.

EFFECT: improved system speed of operation by excluding renewable data search across whole database of electronic trading and localizing search only by temporal and individual signs of goods identifiers.

9 dwg

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